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Posts tagged ‘hatching eggs’

A Flock of Chicken

After 21 days exactly, the first and only egg begin to hatched. I was traveling back from Harrisonburg, so I missed Heningway’s, as he is so lovely called, emergence from life inside the shell. After he had time to dry off he was moved into a brooder where he will stay for four to five weeks.

Any hatchlings are considered a success when dealing with shipped hatching eggs. As we hope to have around five or six chickens, we are no considering whether to order more hatching eggs or go with day-old baby chicks.

It’s been just a little over a week since his arrival and the difference in Heningway’s appearance and level of activity is pretty amazing. He has a small chick feeder with a mason jar on top that he is able to roost on. I figure in a couple of weeks we will have to add some mesh netting to the top of the brooder to keep him in. Read more

The Egg Came First

After weeks of anticipation the hatching eggs arrived at our local post office. Our postmaster is probably thinking “what’s next after bees and chickens?” At least they are getting less dangerous.

Upon their arrival, Dad got them established in their new home (for the next 21 days, give or take a few), a Brinsea Mini Advance Incubator. This incubator provides automatic egg turning with auto-stop two days prior to hatching, a countdown to date of hatch, and temperature alarms. Fancy, fancy. I am excited that we went with hatching eggs, instead of day-old baby chicks, as I am now part of the experience from the very beginning. Read more

Now a Novice Hatcher

I am a soon-to-be co-owner of some Black Australorp chickens. We have a brand new mini incubator in-house and ready for six Black Australorp hatching eggs which should be shipping this week.

“Australorps originated in Australia and were developed from Black Orpingtons imported there from England.  They are gentle and quiet: tremendous layers, producing tons of large brown eggs.  They are among the best egg producing breeds in the world, and currently hold the record for most eggs produced per annum.” (Source: My Pet Chicken)

The hatching eggs will be incubated for around 21 days and then our new friends will start laying eggs in about five to six months. Australorps lay large, brown eggs at a rate of about five per week.

A am a novice when it comes to raising chickens, so I am really looking forward to this experience. Not only will it be fun for me, but the hatching eggs will arrive just in time for Tanner’s first birthday, so we can learn together.