Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘eggs’

Eggstravagant {Daily Harvest}

The days continue to get longer, which means the girls are laying more and more eggs each day. Our flock consists of thirteen hens and one naughty, pain-in-the-butt rooster. We are consistently getting a dozen eggs a day and needless to say, I’m overrun. I counted almost six dozen eggs in my fridge, and we are eating eggs breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Please send your best egg recipe…

Advertisements

Eggs, Eggs Everywhere {And Other Summer Happenings}

What a whirlwind this summer has been. I can’t believe that it’s September. The air is starting to cool and the leaves are leisurely turning an impressive palette of crimson, gold and burnt orange. This is always a favorite time of year for me, but I can’t help but feel a little melancholy thinking that Old Man Winter will awaken soon and slap me in the face with what The Farmer’s Almanac is predicting to be another cold, brutal winter.

Most of my “to-do list” remains uncrossed as free time eludes me between full-time work and tending to the littles. Even so, I wanted to do quick update about what’s been happened this summer.

My garden boxes have actually produced some vegetables this year. From the start, I intended them to be a learning experience, so I was happy with anything they produced. We are still getting some peppers and tomatoes and harvested quite a few squash and cucumbers before powdery mold killed those boxes off. The tomatoe plants are falling over with fruit but none of it seems to want to ripen; I’m thinking that this has something to do with it being so shady. At this point, the large garden is still producing more than enough for all our households, so I’ve left the boxes to the goats and chickens. Next gardening season I think I will move the boxes to the larger garden plot since they are just to shaded at my house and with the animals roaming freely around the property I would need to invest in some fencing to protect it, which probably just isn’t worth it.

The goats are doing well. Our plan to fence in our entire three-acre plot is still on the fence (ha, ha, right?). Once our budget permits we will tackle this improvement, which will most likely be in the spring. Until then, they are living in the temporary enclosure, which they don’t seem to mind. Although it’s heavily wooden and doesn’t have pasture, the goats are allowed to free range most days and enjoy the fresh grasses and brush on our neighbor’s property, who has graciously granted us access to his field. All five of this season’s kids are growing, most coming in at 65+ pounds. We have decided to keep the doelings (Gwen, Ginger and Walnut) and have the two bucklings listed for sale as room necessitates that they find a new home.

IMG_6498

And finally, the chickens! They are very happily free ranging all over the place, and after about five months, we are getting our first eggs. Only problem is the chickens are laying all over the place. We have found eggs in the brush pile, the goat barn and even in Cora’s stroller. We have tried keeping them confined until mid-morning and putting golf balls in the nesting boxes to no avail. So, until further notice, we’ll continue the daily egg hunt. I do have to say, frustration aside, my preschooler thinks it’s a blast to hunt for eggs every morning.

As the seasons transition once again there is so much to do and look forward too. Hopefully, Old Man Winter will be kind and spare us a harsh winter. Until then, here’s to fall!

My Garden is Actually Growing! {Garden Update July}

I’ve heard that you either have a green thumb or are good with animals. Well, most days I feel like I’m pretty middle of the road with both, but I keep at it and each season I gain more skills and do just a little better than last time.

Last summer I got into place four, 4′ x 8′ cedar garden boxes and planted a variety of vegetables, none of which, for one reason or another, grew. This year, I’m at it again, and the garden is looking much better. I have three of the four boxes planted with tomatoes, cucumbers, squash and peppers and all of the plants have vegetables on them currently.

Peppers! The banana peppers are almost ready for picking and will be the first produce harvested from my own garden. I’m not sure what I’ll do with them, since I’m not a big hot pepper person, but it’s a big milestone and I’m pretty excited.

IMG_6446

Read more

Egg in an Egg {Awesome Egg Variation}

Yesterday evening on our trip to the coop to collect eggs from our flock of Black Australorps we discovered an unusual find. In the box was a gigantic, light brown egg, almost three-times the size of a normal egg.

We took it inside and placed our bets. One yolk, two yolk, or maybe it was even a triple-yolker? Tanner thought it might even contain a baby dinosaur (and I was a little weary to bet against him looking at the size of this thing).

The family peered over the bowl as Tanner gave it a crack. To everyone’s excitement out came a yolk and another small egg!

photo 2

According to backyardchickens.com, this egg variation is known as a double egg or “egg in an egg” and is “created when an egg with a shell is encased by the next egg in the oviduct and another shell is produced over the outer egg as well.”

It was such a neat discovery!

Now a Novice Hatcher

I am a soon-to-be co-owner of some Black Australorp chickens. We have a brand new mini incubator in-house and ready for six Black Australorp hatching eggs which should be shipping this week.

“Australorps originated in Australia and were developed from Black Orpingtons imported there from England.  They are gentle and quiet: tremendous layers, producing tons of large brown eggs.  They are among the best egg producing breeds in the world, and currently hold the record for most eggs produced per annum.” (Source: My Pet Chicken)

The hatching eggs will be incubated for around 21 days and then our new friends will start laying eggs in about five to six months. Australorps lay large, brown eggs at a rate of about five per week.

A am a novice when it comes to raising chickens, so I am really looking forward to this experience. Not only will it be fun for me, but the hatching eggs will arrive just in time for Tanner’s first birthday, so we can learn together.